Israel/Palestine and the PC(USA)

Part of our work is to seek and encourage faithful policy regarding Israel/Palestine within the PC(USA). Below is the latest content that concerns how our Israel/Palestine work is expressed particularly within the PC(USA). You can also find many resources on the PC(USA) website.

Convocation of Peacemakers Video

A great video of a great event!

Thank you to Andrew Patterson for his wonderful videography work!

Presbyterian response to comments about Middle East Study Team report

The Stated Clerk of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), has issued a statement in response to published comments about the Middle East Study Team report that will be considered at the 219th General Assembly (2010) when it meets this summer.

PPF's GA Summary

PC(USA) takes strong action for peace.

As divisions around issues of sexuality continue to dominate conversations in the wake of the 218th General Assembly of the PC(USA), our church has demonstrated remarkable unity in its collective call to peacemaking. In fact, on many issues there was such consensus among commissioners that little or no discussion was offered in plenary sessions. We want to highlight the many ways our denomination adopted policies that will strengthen its larger witness for peacemaking in our broken world.

Assembly calls for peacemaking in Israel/Palestine

Photo of a large room with rows of people seated at tables. Speakers stand on a stage in front of a large screen at the front of the room.
The Committee on Peacemaking and International Issues reported on Latin American issues on Friday afternoon. Photo by Joseph Williams

SAN JOSE, June 27, 2008 — Commissioners to the 218th General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) “stayed the course” of being peacemakers around the world. The Assembly called for “responsibly” bringing the troops home from Iraq, continuing peacemaking in Israel and Palestine and supporting human rights in Zimbabwe, the Philippines, North Korea and Colombia.

Issues concerning peace, as it relates to the Middle East and other crisis areas of the world, took the majority of the committee’s time during deliberations earlier this week. Their mindful discernment helped the full General Assembly to move business quickly and collaboratively. As a result, the full assembly quickly passed overtures that affirmed immediate food aid to North Korea, civil rights accompaniment to citizens of Colombia and a careful approach to peacemaking in Israel and Palestine.

GA passes several strong actions for peace

The 218th General Assembly of the PC(USA) has taken action on several recommendations from the committee on Peacemaking and International Issues, concerning the Philippines, Colombia, Conscientious Objectors, and Israel/Palestine:

Power of nonviolence lies in action, speaker says

Photo of a man at a podium speaking into a microphone
Mubarak Awad, director of Nonviolence International and co-founder of the Palestinian Center for the Study of Nonviolence. Photo by Joseph Williams

SAN JOSE, June 25, 2008 — As the familiar strains of standard hymns drifted through the dividing walls at the Fairmont Hotel here, some 300 Presbyterians were called by Mubarak Awad, a Palestinian nonviolence expert, to take down the walls and fences built by human hands. Awad addressed the Presbyterian Peace Fellowship (PPF) Breakfast, replacing the originally scheduled speaker, Jonathan Kuttab, a lay preacher and human rights attorney, who was unable to attend. The breakfast was held in conjunction with the meeting of the 218th General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). 

‘I am a Palestinian. I have no bombs.’ — Archbishop Chacour

by Eva Stimson
Presbyterian News Service

SAN JOSE, June 25, 2008 — Archbishop Elias Chacour calls himself “a walking contradiction.”

‘I wanted it demolished on all our heads’

by Mike Ferguson
Presbyterian News Service

SAN JOSE, June 25, 2008 — Elias Chacour, Archbishop of Galilee for the Melkite Greek Catholic Church, points to the Northern Israel city of Haifa as an important role model where Jews, Christians and Muslims can exist together — but not necessarily coexist.

Pages